RESILIENCE

Resilience is the process of managing stress and functioning well even when faced with challenges, adversity, and trauma. Parents who are able to cope with the stresses of everyday life, as well as an occasional crisis, have resilience.


Resilient parents also know how to seek help to overcome challenging situations. A parent’s ability to deal with life’s ups and downs serves as a model for their children, promoting critical self-regulation and problem-solving skills. Because no one gets through life without having to deal with stress, resilience is an important life skill to develop.

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"I will continue to have courage during stress or after a crisis."

Life Challenges:


Being a parent can be a wonderful experience much of the time. But parenting also comes with its share of challenges. Parenting stress is caused by personal pressures (stressors), as well as those that arise in relation to having children:


  • Typical events and life changes (e.g., moving to a new city or not being able to soothe a crying baby)

  • Unexpected events (e.g., losing a job or discovering that your child has a medical condition or disability)

  • Individual factors (e.g., substance abuse or traumatic experiences)

  • Social factors (e.g., relationship difficulties or feelings loneliness and isolation)

  • Community, societal, and environmental conditions (e.g., persistent poverty, racism, or a natural disaster)


According to the Center for the Study of Social Policy, experts have concluded that how parents respond to stressors is much more important than the stressor itself in determining the outcomes for themselves and their children. Parents are more likely to achieve healthy, favorable outcomes if they are resilient.

How to Build Resilience

Some stressors parents face can be managed relatively easily so that problems get resolved. For example, calling a relative or friend to pick-up a child from school when you are delayed at work. But some stressors cannot be easily resolved.


For this reason, we don’t measure resilience by a parent’s ability to fix problems. Rather, parents are resilient when they are able to call forth their inner strength to proactively meet personal challenges and those in relation to their child, manage adversities, heal the effects of trauma, and thrive given the unique characteristics and circumstances of their family.


All parents have inner strengths and resources that can serve as a foundation for building resilience. These may include faith, flexibility, humor, communications skills, problem-solving skills, mutually supportive caring relationships, or the ability to identify and access outside resources and services when needed. These qualities can be nurtured and developed through skill-building activities and supportive interactions with others.

Quick Tips for Building Resilience

Life Challenges:


Being a parent can be a wonderful experience much of the time. But parenting also comes with its share of challenges. Parenting stress is caused by personal pressures (stressors), as well as those that arise in relation to having children:


  • Typical events and life changes (e.g., moving to a new city or not being able to soothe a crying baby)

  • Unexpected events (e.g., losing a job or discovering that your child has a medical condition or disability)

  • Individual factors (e.g., substance abuse or traumatic experiences)

  • Social factors (e.g., relationship difficulties or feelings loneliness and isolation)

  • Community, societal, and environmental conditions (e.g., persistent poverty, racism, or a natural disaster)


According to the Center for the Study of Social Policy, experts have concluded that how parents respond to stressors is much more important than the stressor itself in determining the outcomes for themselves and their children. Parents are more likely to achieve healthy, favorable outcomes if they are resilient.

New Hampshire Children's Trust 501(c)3

The Concord Center, 10 Ferry Street, Suite 307, Concord, NH 03301​

info@nhchildrenstrust.org | (603) 224-1279

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