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Hope Starts Here: The Prevention Connection

When & Where

  • April 1, 2019

    Grappone Conference Center
    70 Constitution Ave
    Concord, NH 03301

    General registration fees:
    Early-bird— $99
    Regular—$125

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April 1, 2019

Grappone Conference Center
70 Constitution Ave
Concord, NH 03301

General registration fees:
Early-bird— $99
Regular—$125

Meet Our 2019 Summit Keynote Speaker:

Robert Sege, MD, PhD is a Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics  at Tufts University School of Medicine, where he directs a new Center for Community-Engaged Medicine.  Dr. Sege is nationally known for his research on effective health systems approaches that directly address the social determinants of health. He is a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of Social Policy in Washington and serves on the boards of the Massachusetts Children’s Trust and Prevent Child Abuse America.  He has served on the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect and on its Committee on Injury, Violence, and Poisoning Prevention. He is a graduate of Yale College and he received his PhD in Biology from MIT and his MD from Harvard Medical School. Bob lives in the Boston area, where he and his wife Karen have raised three young adult children.  

Schedule Overview:

8:00 – 8:30     Registration & Networking

8:30 – 9:00     Welcoming Remarks

9:00 – 9:15     Occurrence of ACEs in New Hampshire: The Data and Its Implications

9:15 – 10:30     Keynote by Robert Sege, MD, PhD

10:30 – 10:45     Break

10:45 – 12:15     Workshop Session 1

12:15 – 1:15     Lunch & Resource Tables

1:15 – 2:45    Workshop Session 2

2:45 – 3:00    Break

3:00 – 4:30    Workshop Session 3

4:30 – 4:45    Complete Summit Evaluations


The Day's Schedule Includes:

Occurances of ACEs in New Hampshire: The Data and Its Implications
Presented by: Laura Milliken, Director Spark NH and Patricia Tilley, Deputy Director of the Division of Public Health Services, NH Department of Health and Human Services

All Attendees

The link between increased risk of poor health outcomes and exposure to certain adverse child experiences was well established by the important 1997 CDC study commonly called the ACEs study.  In 2017 New Hampshire added a series of questions to the annually administered Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Survey that sought to identify the rate of exposure to 7 adverse childhood experiences in New Hampshire and identify what correlation, if any, there was to adult health. 

Laura Milliken is Director of Spark NH, New Hampshire’s governor-appointed early childhood advisory council.  She is an attorney who worked with at risk families and in 2011, moved to the prevention side of the work. She believes that if all families have access to developmental opportunities for their children that build healthy brain architecture, we can prevent the kinds of crises she addressed and create thriving communities for New Hampshire.

Patricia Tilley is the Deputy Director of the Division of Public Health Services, NH Department of Health and Human Services. She is responsible for fostering systemic approaches to promote health and wellbeing, preventing chronic conditions and infectious disease through population-level strategies and interventions,reducing health inequities across the lifespan, and preventing premature death, disease, and disability from environmental causes.

Keynote Address—HOPE: New Insights into the Role of Positive Experiences on Child and Family Development
Presented by: Robert Sege, MD, PhD, Director Center for Community Engaged Medicine, Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts University School of Medicine

All Attendees

“The future of our society is bright, and it rests with our children, who are the leaders, parents, citizens and workforce of the future. In turn, the well-being of our children is the responsibility of all of us. Current brain and social sciences have shed light on the impact of childhood adversity, risks, and toxic and negative factors impacting healthy child development. Yet this focus can only go so far in prescribing what is needed for a thriving society.” (Sege, R., Bethell, C., Linkenbach, J., Jones, J., Klika, B. & Pecora, P.J. 2017. Balancing Adverse Childhood Experiences with HOPE: New Insights Into the Role of Positive Experience on Child and Family Development. Boston: The Medical Foundation)

 

Workshop Session 1: 10:45–12:15

1A. Integrating HOPE into Practice

Presented by: Dr. Robert Sege, MD, PhD, and Dr. J. Bart Klika, MSW, PhD
Format: Presenter-led

Balancing our understanding of adverse childhood experiences (ACE’s) with HOPE (Healthy Outcomes of Positive Experiences) is key to improving the health and well-being of children and families.  Using the HOPE framework, this interactive session will explore strategies to support the growth and development of positive experiences for the families we serve. Presenters will discuss ways in which the HOPE framework can be embedded within engagement, assessment, treatment planning, and evaluation. 

Robert Sege, MD, PhD is a Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine, where he directs a new Center for Community-engaged Medicine.  Dr. Sege is nationally known for his research on effective health systems approaches that directly address the social determinants of health. He is a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of Social Policy in Washington and serves on the boards of the Massachusetts Children’s Trust and Prevent Child Abuse America.  He has served on the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect and on its Committee on Injury, Violence, and Poisoning Prevention. He is a graduate of Yale College and he received his PhD in Biology from MIT and his MD from Harvard Medical School. Bob lives in the Boston area where he and his wife Karen have raised three young adult children. 

J. Bart Klika, MSW, PhD is the Chief Research and Strategy Officer with the national organization Prevent Child Abuse America. His research examines the causes and consequences associated with child abuse and neglect in an effort to prevent its occurrence. Dr. Klika is on the national Board of Directors for APSAC and is the chair of the APSAC prevention committee.  Recently, Dr. Klika served as the senior editor for the APSAC Handbook on Child Maltreatment (4th Ed.).

1B. Adoption’s Impact on Children’s Sensory Processing and Executive Functioning  

Presented by: Barbara Neiman, BS, Health Discovery
Format: Presenter-led

Adolescence for teens who experience adoption and foster care can create feelings of abandonment, intense emotions and actions. They seek answers about themselves and history. This workshop will help teens, parents and professionals to utilize body mind techniques that fuel the brain and support emotional regulation. Activities for a safety container, intuition, roots of our identity, tools for our unique special needs, learning to take deep rest are a few activities Barbara Neiman, author, Occupational therapist and adoptive parent will share from her new book called the Adopted Teen Workbook: Develop Confidence, Strength and Resilience on the Path to Adulthood.

Barbara Neiman is a holistic pediatric Occupational Therapist with 40 years’ experience. She is a single adoptive parent who accompanied her daughter back to Russia for a birth search journey. Barbara is a national speaker on adoption, special needs, adolescent issues, somatic awareness, trauma informed yoga, mindfulness for schools, and sensory processing. She is a Yoga Teacher 200RYT, a certified Body Mind Centering practitioner and a coach for adoptive and special needs families. She currently has a practice in early intervention, adoption support for families, children and teens. She is an author whose books and tools are available on Amazon.com.  www.barbaraneiman.com or www.adoptedteensupport.com.

1C. Forever Hope: A Two-Generation Approach with Families Affected by Substance-Use Disorder 

Presented by: Karen Welford, MPAff, Forever Hope Training Center, and Michelle Lennon, Forever Hope Training Center
Format: Presenter-led

This workshop addresses the issue of Substance Use Disorder through a 2-generation lens, giving information on the effects of substance use on children and on all members of the family. Information on opioids and their effects on the brain and the Stages of Recovery in the context of the Strengthening Families™ Protective Families framework are discussed. A Family Resource Center that is also a Peer Recovery Center is presented as a model of service. 

Karen Welford has spent over thirty years supporting families with young children in Massachusetts and New Hampshire and throughout New England. She feels fortunate to have held the positions of Early Intervention Program Director as well as Director of Early Intervention Field Services for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health; Director of Early Intervention Professional Development and Quality for New Hampshire’s Bureau of Developmental Services; and Technical Assistance Specialist for the New England Head Start Quality Initiative. She was the Director of the Family Resource Center in Laconia New Hampshire for 10 years and is an adjunct professor at Plymouth State University. Most recently, she was the Executive Director for Belknap House, a shelter for homeless families in her hometown of Laconia. She is a certified trainer in the Standards of Quality for Family Strengthening and Support and Bringing the Protective Factors Framework to Life in your Work. Karen holds a BS in Nursing and earned a master’s degree in Public Affairs from the McCormack Institute of the University of Massachusetts.

In response to the opioid epidemic in her community, and with a passion for working with families, Michelle and her community opened the Greater Tilton Area Family Resource Center in 2015. She is currently the Executive Director. The GTAFRC has become a model for supporting individuals affected by substance use in the context of their family and within their community. Michelle is a certified Parent Educator in Nurturing Skills, Parent as Teachers, and Active Parenting and is a Certified Trainer for the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery’s Recovery Coach Academy and Recovery Basics for Parents. Michelle is active in numerous community and state advisory boards and earned a MA in Ministry in 2015. She is Pastor of the Northfield-Tilton Congregational Church.

1D. Human Trafficking 101—Having a Collective Impact

Presented by: Joelyn, Drennan, MFA, Sr. Intensive Case Manager for the New Hampshire Human Trafficking Collaborative Task Force, and Donna Plourde, Executive Director of Real Life Giving
Format: Presenter-led

This workshop will examine the presence and prevalence of human trafficking in New Hampshire. Material covered will include lessons learned from victims/survivors, promising practices for healing, prevention strategies, and the impact of early intervention on reducing the risk of future victimization. Participants will learn how to identify and respond to potential cases of sex/labor trafficking, and will gain understanding of related vulnerabilities and risk factors. The workshop will highlight the State of New Hampshire's response to human trafficking and the resources and victim services available, and it will promote the value of holistic and collaborative responses to gaps in service.

Joelyn Drennan is the Sr. Intensive Case Manager for the New Hampshire Human Trafficking Collaborative Task Force. She is a U.S. Navy veteran and a New Hampshire native whose career in social services began over a decade ago with a part-time position at a residential home for boys. It was this experience that inspired her lifelong commitment to serving her community. Joelyn draws on the knowledge and skills gained from a career centered on serving at-risk/high-risk youth populations to inform her current work on the Task Force. Joelyn holds a Bachelor's degree in Social Science and Master of Fine Arts from Southern New Hampshire University.

Donna Plourde is the Executive Director of Real Life Giving. She is a long-time advocate for helping women understand their innate value through fighting objectification and gender bias. Donna is committed to combating sex trafficking and exploitation in our communities through education, prevention and outreach. A certified trainer with the Faith Alliance Against Slavery and Trafficking with more than 10 years of experience, she has presented at workshops and conferences providing training to educators, social service and healthcare providers. Donna also believes an informed community is key to the effort and works to bring awareness and prevention events to community and civic groups, youth organizations, churches and schools. Donna is a New Hampshire native who enjoys exploring the region with her husband Rick. She loves creating word art, reading a good book from her ever-growing pile and enjoying a thought-provoking conversation with her family and friends.

1E. Developing Resilient Children via Supportive Families & School Environments

Presented by: Drs. William & Monica Nicoll, Resilience Counseling & Training Center
Format: Presenter led

Participants will be introduced to the research on highly effective families, ACE's, and the development of resilience in children as a "social vaccine" for immunizing youth from personal, social and academic adjustment problems. The essential components of supportive family, school, and community environments will be described along with practical strategies for parents and teachers to enhance these factors in the lives of children. Participants will also be introduced to strategies for fostering positive social-emotional development of children in both the home and the school from a trauma informed/resilience based approach.

Drs. Bill & Monica Nicoll are co-directors of the Resilience Counseling & Training Center in North Conway, NH. They provide counseling services for individuals, families and couples with a specific focus on resilience and promoting social-emotional well-being.  They also provide consulting and training services for families, schools and mental health organizations worldwide. Bill & Monica serve as the USA coordinators for the European Network for Social Emotional Competence. They recently completed their new book entitled, "Developing Resilient Children & Supportive Families: What parents need to know".  Monica has also published two children's books with parent & teacher guidelines for developing children's social-emotional competence.


Workshop Session 2: 1:15-2:45

2A. “Your Money, Your Goals” Talking Finances with the Families You Serve

Presented by: Cary Gladstone, MS, Granite United Way
Format: Presenter-led

Attendees will become familiar with Your Money, Your Goals, a toolkit for financial empowerment from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.  This toolkit provides concrete support in times of need by giving social service providers the skills they need to assist clients with managing their finances, including goal-setting, credit repair, taxes, and saving for both short- and long-term needs.  Participants are invited to use any information gained in managing their own personal finances!

Note: This workshop is not approved for continuing education units by the NH Guardian ad Litem Board.

Cary Gladstone has more than 20 years of experience working with low-income families to help them become more financially stable.  He has been with Granite United Way since 2012, where he serves as Senior Director of Asset Building Strategies.  Cary chairs the statewide CA$H (Creating Assets, Savings and Hope) Coalition of New Hampshire and is on the board of directors at CATCH Neighborhood Housing.

2B. Supporting New Hampshire GrandFamilies 

Presented by: MaryLou Beaver, Chair, GrandFamilies Advisory Council, Rochester, and Carol Lunan, The Grapevine Family and Community Resource Center
Format: Presenter-led with panel 

In New Hampshire, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of grandparents who have become the primary caregivers of their grandchildren. It is estimated that there are more than 10,000 New Hampshire grandparents raising their grandchildren. These grandparentsand the children they care for have unique needs and require support services that understand and recognize those needs. This workshop will focus on the work currently underway in the State to support the grandparents and the childen they are caring for, as well as information on services and programs being discussed and studied: Peer Support Groups, accessing resources, services ane programs, a Legislative Commission to Study GrandFamlies. There will also be an interactive discussion with a panel of grandparent caregivers.

MaryLou is the founder of Kids First Consulting, LLC and was the New Hampshire Director for Every Child Matters for over ten years.

Carol Lunan, Family Support Director and Parenting Facilitator at The Grapevine. Carol is a parent educator and facilitator who has been at The Grapevine Family and Community Resource Center since 2000. She was one of the first award recipients of the Kay Sidway award for family support.

2C. Changing Social Norms to Support Positive Parenting

Presented by: J. Bart Klika, MSW, PHD
Format: Presenter-led

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified social norms change as one of the key strategies for advancing the prevention of child abuse and neglect.  Social norms refer to the mainstream attitudes, behaviors, and expectations of a group of people.  In this presentation, results from a representative national survey commissioned by Prevent Child Abuse America will be used to describe social norms (actual and perceived) related to child abuse and neglect in the United States and how those results have been used to shift social norms.

J. Bart Klika, MSW, PhD is the Chief Research and Strategy Officer with the national organization Prevent Child Abuse America. His research examines the causes and consequences associated with child abuse and neglect in an effort to prevent its occurrence. Dr. Klika is on the national Board of Directors for APSAC and is the chair of the APSAC prevention committee.  Recently, Dr. Klika served as the senior editor for the APSAC Handbook on Child Maltreatment (4th Ed.).

2D. Home Visiting: A Way to Support and Strengthen HOPE

Presented by: Aurelia Moran, M.Ed., State of New Hampshire, Maternal and Child Health Section
Format: Panel

An overview of home visiting, part of a continuum of family support and strengthening programs available to NH families will be discussed. This session is rooted in the social ecological theory of development and highlights the impact that healthy connection, at all levels, has in supporting healthy development.  Space for conference-participant sharing and processing of experiences that bolster Health Outcomes of Positive Experiences will be provided.  This will be an interactive session with opportunities to increase connection among participants and heighten participant awarenss of how to infuse these concepts into working with famileis and communities to strengthen deeper connections with each other and share strateies.  This session will also provide greater insight into how, through a parallel process, home visitor/family support specialist interaction with families and strong relationships and communication with supervisors built through reflective supervision can influence greater systemic change and opportunities to shift community norms..  

Aurelia Moran, M.Ed., received her BA from the University of New Hampshire where she studied Psychology with a double minor in Women’s Studies and Race, Culture, & Power.  She received her Master’s degree in Education from Plymouth State University where she studied Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Aurelia has worked in a variety of home visiting programs in a variety of roles over the years.  Most recently she worked in the Healthy Families America program as a home visitor and family assessment worker at the birth of the program in her county and later became a supervisor and program manager for the HFA program in Belknap County, NH.  Aurelia now works with the State of New Hampshire as the Home Visiting Program Supervisor.

2E. Using Yoga and Mindfulness to Build Connection and Resilience in Families

Presented by: Lisa Flynn, ChildLight Yoga/Yoga 4 Classrooms
Format: Presenter-led

A growing body of evidence supports integration of yoga and mindfulness education for children, families and in schools. In this experiential session, learn how simple, trauma-informed practices can create positive experiences which promote the development of social and emotional competencies of all involved, while strengthening relationships. Session participants will receive a note-taking guide with illustrated activities to share with children and families, “Strong Children, Strong Families,” an excerpt from the presenter’s book, Yoga for Children, and a variety of other helpful resources for those interested in learning more.

Note: This workshop is not approved for continuing education units by the NH Guardian ad Litem Board.

Lisa Flynn is a respected leader in the field of yoga and mindfulness for children and in schools. Her ChildLight Yoga and Yoga 4 Classrooms organizations provide evidence and trauma-informed professional development training, curricula, products and support for those who support the social, emotional and physical well-being of children. Lisa is author of the Yoga 4 Classrooms Activity Card Deck; Yoga for Children: 200+ Yoga Poses, Breathing Exercises and Meditations for Healthier, Happier, More Resilient Children; and the newly released Yoga for Children—Yoga Cards: 50+ Yoga and Mindfulness Activities for Kids. Lisa is also contributor to Best Practices for Yoga in Schools and is sponsor of the free Research Repository: Yoga, Meditation and Mindfulness for Children, Adolescents and in Schools. She is an award-winning entrepreneur and national presenter whose work has been featured on Fox News as well as in notable publications including Education Week, Forbes, Yoga Journal, and Parents Magazine. Lisa lives in southern Maine with her husband and the children (now teenagers) who inspired her to create a business promoting whole child health and emotional resilience. ChildLight Yoga, based in Dover, NH was named "Small Business of the Year" for its notable, transformative contributions at the local and national level.


Workshop Session 3: 3:00-4:30

3A. Considering A Resiliency Network for New Hampshire 

Presented by: Moira O’Neill, Office of the Child Advocate, and Representative Joelle Martin
Format: Presenter-led

This workshop will address the need for coordinating efforts promoting childhood resiliency for New Hampshire’s children. We will review networks of support, education, research and advocacy in other states and nationally. Participants will be invited to share their knowledge of undertakings to promote resiliency and brainstorm for the establishment of a Resiliency Network in New Hampshire. 

Moira O'Neill is the first Child Advocate for the State of New Hampshire.  Her office is mandated to oversee the Division of Children, Youth and Families and to promote the best interests of New Hampshire's children.

Representative Joelle Martin serves on the House Ways & Means Committee as well as the Steering Committee for the Legislative Children’s Caucus. Joelle is passionate about her role as representative and is committed to being a voice for her community.

3B. Building Trust in Children and Families Outside of the Clinical Office  

Presented by: Harvey Feldman and Sarah Ausman, Spaulding Youth Center
Format: Panel

Trust Based Relational Intervention (TBRI) is a non-clinical practice that was first used in foster care with children who have experienced abuse, neglect, or other trauma. It is based in teaching children who have experienced trauma how to have safe relationships with adults and learning to trust.  Spaulding Youth Center has taken this practice one step further and integrated into all programs on campus, including staff that do not provide direct care. This allows for anyone on campus to be able to have tools to interact with even the most trauma-affected child in a way that is meaningful. Rather than walking away in a difficult situation, any staff member is able to interact in a way that helps the child to heal. This practice has, at its core 3 basic principles to connect, empower and correct. This workshop will provide a basic overview of the practice and even some simple techniques to use in different settings.

Harvey Feldman is currently the Clinical Supervisor at Spaulding Youth Center. Harvey is also one of 4 trainers at Spaulding that teaches TBRI (Trust Based Relational Intervention). He has used it in his work with foster families and now has infused it to all staff of Spaulding. Harvey holds a Master's degree in teaching from Columbia and in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Goddard College with a concentration in Gender and Sexuality. Harvey has extensive experience working with children in various venues including acute treatment settings. His work is trauma informed and attachment based.  Sarah has worked in community services in various capacities for the last 10 years.  

Sarah Ausman is a Clinician at Spaulding Youth Center in the Community-Based Program.  Sarah has worked in community services in various capacities for the last 10 years.  Sarah received her Bachelors in Social Work at LaSalle University in 2009, and is currently working on her Masters in Social Work through University of New England, with an anticipated graduation of August 2019.  Sarah is passionate about providing trauma-informed care to families and children, especially post-adoptive families. Sarah has also, in partnership with Harvey Feldman, has led the Trust Based Relational Intervention (TBRI) training initiative at Spaulding Youth Center.  Sarah has also focused on the TBRI training initiative in community based settings to promote attachment and therapeutic parenting. Sarah lives in Bridgewater, NH with her partner and their 2-year-old black lab, Blackjack.

3C. Supporting Authentic Family Voice in NH 

Presented by Kelly Untiet, NH Department of Education, and Mary Lane, NH Department of Education
Format: Presenter led

The NH Department of Education believes and research confirms that children thrive when families play an active role in their education.  To that end, the Department, with support from several community partners, is committed to engaging families, educators, and communities to improve educational outcomes for NH students. In this session, you will learn how the Dual-Capacity Framework can support the creation of strong, supportive relationships that elicit authentic family voice and ensure it informs the way schools “do business.”

Kelly currently serves as the Communications Coordinator and Family and Youth Engagement lead within the Office of Social & Emotional Wellness, Bureau of STudent Wellness at the NH Department of Education.

Mary Lane is an Educational Consultant working within the Bureau of Special Education at the NH Department of Education. Mary serves as the lead on with the NH Scholastic Center for Authentic Family Voice.

3D. Building Resilience in Children Impacted by Parental Incarceration 

Presented by: Tiffani Arsenault, MS, Family Connections Center, New Hampshire Department of Corrections
Format: Presenter-led

One in 28 children have a parent incarcerated; that’s one in every classroom across the United States. Although incarceration is common and “normal” for many children it is still a taboo topic lacking in awareness and education for the various professionals who come into contact with these children.  During this presentation you will learn some facts around incarceration and who it impacts, some of the potential adverse outcomes for children with an incarcerated parent, and what professionals can do to help children heal and thrive despite their parent’s incarceration.

Ms. Arsenault has been working with families since 2005 in settings including juvenile residential, community mental health, and most recently those effected by incarceration. For the last 8 years she has been running the Family Connections Center (FCC) at the Northern NH Correctional Facility in Berlin. This Center is one of three family support programs for parents incarcerated in the NH Department of Corrections, the state’s prison system. The mission of the FCC is to strengthen the connections between incarcerated parents and their families while facilitating ties to their communities through education and support.  Ms. Arsenault holds her Masters in Adult, Juvenile and Community Correctional Leadership and has had an article published in the Parenting Connection magazine (Spring 2016) titled Parenting from Prison Made Easier.  

3E. From Childhood to Super Hero: Helping Kids Find Their Cape  

Presented by: Linda Douglas, M.Ed., NH Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence
Format: Presenter-Led

This workshop will discuss adverse childhood experiences and how young children can discover their own inner resilience by imagining they are super heroes.  By discussing super heroes, their origin stories (before the cape), and the choices that they made for good, children can learn how they can also be resilient, find their cape, and make the choice to use their powers for good.

Linda Douglas is the Trauma Specialist for the New Hampshire Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence working to enhance the capacity of member programs of the coalition, and local communities, to address the affects of trauma and the complex needs of victims with mental health and substance abuse problems.  She has provided training to crisis center staff on the issues of domestic violence, substance abuse and mental health over the past nine years using trauma informed materials. Over the past seven years she has expanded her expertise to understanding the effects of trauma and domestic violence on children.  Linda has also been providing training to the Division of Children, Youth and Families and the Bureau of Housing Supports.

2019 Summit Sponsors

 

 

Join our growing list of sponsors! Check out our sponsorship kit by clicking here.